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The voice of the Guide Peter Jones in the first two radio series and TV versions, later William Franklyn in the third, fourth and fifth radio series, and Stephen Fry in the movie version , also provides general narration. The first radio series of six episodes called "Fits" after the names of the sections of Lewis Carroll 's nonsense poem " The Hunting of the Snark " [16] was broadcast in on BBC Radio 4. The BBC had a practice at the time of commissioning "Christmas Special" episodes for popular radio series, and while an early draft of this episode of The Hitchhiker's Guide had a Christmas-related plotline, it was decided to be "in slightly poor taste" and the episode as transmitted served as a bridge between the two series.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to Changing Stories Across Mediums

The first series was repeated twice in alone and many more times in the next few years. This led to an LP re-recording , produced independently of the BBC for sale, and a further adaptation of the series as a book. A second radio series, which consisted of a further five episodes, and bringing the total number of episodes to 12, was broadcast in He was cast after it was decided that a "Peter Jonesy" sort of voice was required. This led to a three-month search for an actor who sounded exactly like Peter Jones, which was unsuccessful.

The producers then hired Peter Jones as exactly the "Peter Jonesy" voice they were looking for. The series was also notable for its use of sound, being the first comedy series to be produced in stereo. Much of the programme's budget was spent on sound effects, which were largely the work of Paddy Kingsland for the pilot episode and the complete second series at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and Dick Mills and Harry Parker for the remaining episodes 2—6 of the first series.

The fact that they were at the forefront of modern radio production in and was reflected when the three new series of Hitchhiker's became some of the first radio shows to be mixed into four-channel Dolby Surround. This mix was also featured on DVD releases of the third radio series. The theme tune used for the radio, television, LP and film versions is " Journey of the Sorcerer ", an instrumental piece composed by Bernie Leadon and recorded by The Eagles on their album One of These Nights.

Only the transmitted radio series used the original recording; a sound-alike cover by Tim Souster was used for the LP and TV series, another arrangement by Joby Talbot was used for the film, and still another arrangement, this time by Philip Pope , was recorded to be released with the CDs of the last three radio series. Apparently, Adams chose this song for its futuristic-sounding nature, but also for the fact that it had a banjo in it, which, as Geoffrey Perkins recalls, Adams said would give an "on the road, hitch-hiking feel" to it. The twelve episodes were released in a slightly edited form, removing the Pink Floyd music and two other tunes "hummed" by Marvin when the team land on Magrathea on CD and cassette in , becoming the first CD release in the BBC Radio Collection.

They were re-released in , and at this time Adams suggested that they could retitle Fits the First to Sixth as "The Primary Phase" and Fits the Seventh to Twelfth as "The Secondary Phase" instead of just "the first series" and "the second series". On 21 June , the BBC announced in a press release [24] that a new series of Hitchhiker's based on the third novel would be broadcast as part of its autumn schedule, produced by Above the Title Productions Ltd.

The episodes were recorded in late , but actual transmission was delayed while an agreement was reached with The Walt Disney Company over Internet re-broadcasts, as Disney had begun pre-production on the film. The third series was broadcast in September and October The fourth and fifth were broadcast in May and June , with the fifth series following immediately after the fourth.

CD releases accompanied the transmission of the final episode in each series. The adaptation of the third novel followed the book very closely, which caused major structural issues in meshing with the preceding radio series in comparison to the second novel. Because many events from the radio series were omitted from the second novel, and those that did occur happened in a different order, the two series split in completely different directions.

Looking back at 2005's The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy

The last two adaptations vary somewhat—some events in Mostly Harmless are now foreshadowed in the adaptation of So Long and Thanks For All The Fish , while both include some additional material that builds on incidents in the third series to tie all five and their divergent plotlines together, most especially including the character Zaphod more prominently in the final chapters and addressing his altered reality to include the events of the Secondary Phase.

While Mostly Harmless originally contained a rather bleak ending, Dirk Maggs created a different ending for the transmitted radio version, ending it on a much more upbeat note, reuniting the cast one last time. The core cast for the third to fifth radio series remained the same, except for the replacement of Peter Jones by William Franklyn as the Book, and Richard Vernon by Richard Griffiths as Slartibartfast, since both had died. Homage to Jones' iconic portrayal of the Book was paid twice: the gradual shift of voices to a "new" version in episode 13, launching the new productions, and a blend of Jones and Franklyn's voices at the end of the final episode, the first part of Maggs' alternative ending.

Also reprising their roles from the original radio series were Jonathan Pryce as Zarniwoop here blended with a character from the final novel to become Zarniwoop Vann Harl , Rula Lenska as Lintilla and her clones and also as the Voice of the Bird , and Roy Hudd as Milliways compere Max Quordlepleen, as well as the original radio series' announcer, John Marsh. Finally, Adams himself played the role of Agrajag, a performance adapted from his book-on-tape reading of the third novel, and edited into the series created some time after the author's death.

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Some even read my books. The novels are described as "a trilogy in five parts", having been described as a trilogy on the release of the third book, and then a "trilogy in four parts" on the release of the fourth book.

The US edition of the fifth book was originally released with the legend "The fifth book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhiker's Trilogy" on the cover. Subsequent re-releases of the other novels bore the legend "The [first, second, third, fourth] book in the increasingly inaccurately named Hitchhiker's Trilogy". In addition, the blurb on the fifth book describes it as "the book that gives a whole new meaning to the word 'trilogy ' ".

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The plots of the television and radio series are more or less the same as that of the first two novels, though some of the events occur in a different order and many of the details are changed. Much of parts five and six of the radio series were written by John Lloyd , but his material did not make it into the other versions of the story and is not included here.

Many consider the books' version of events to be definitive because they are the most readily accessible and widely distributed version of the story. However, they are not the final version that Adams produced. Before his death from a heart attack on 11 May , Adams was considering writing a sixth novel in the Hitchhiker's series.

He was working on a third Dirk Gently novel, under the working title The Salmon of Doubt , but felt that the book was not working and abandoned it. In an interview, he said some of the ideas in the book might fit better in the Hitchhiker's series, and suggested he might rework those ideas into a sixth book in that series.


  1. Jasmines;
  2. Four Towers;
  3. Slip Knot: Zac Tremble Investigates (Series One Case Seven)?

He described Mostly Harmless as "a very bleak book" and said he "would love to finish Hitchhiker on a slightly more upbeat note". Adams also remarked that if he were to write a sixth instalment, he would at least start with all the characters in the same place. In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy published in , the characters visit the legendary planet Magrathea, home to the now-collapsed planet-building industry, and meet Slartibartfast , a planetary coastline designer who was responsible for the fjords of Norway.

Through archival recordings, he relates the story of a race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who built a computer named Deep Thought to calculate the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. When the answer was revealed to be 42 , Deep Thought explained that the answer was incomprehensible because the beings didn't know what the Question they were asking actually was.

It went on to predict that another computer, more powerful than itself, would be made and designed by it to calculate the question for the answer. Later on, referencing this, Adams would create the 42 Puzzle , a puzzle which could be approached in multiple ways, all yielding the answer The computer, often mistaken for a planet because of its size and use of biological components , was the Earth, and was destroyed by Vogons to make way for a hyperspatial express route five minutes before the conclusion of its million-year program.

Two members of the race of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings who commissioned the Earth in the first place disguise themselves as Trillian's mice , and want to dissect Arthur's brain to help reconstruct the question, since he was part of the Earth's matrix moments before it was destroyed, and so he is likely to have part of the question buried in his brain.

Douglas Adams' the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: the Authorized Collection (Comic)

Trillian is also human but had left Earth six months previously with Zaphod Beeblebrox, the President of the Galaxy with two heads and three arms. The protagonists escape, setting the course for "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe". The book was adapted from the first four radio episodes. It was first published in , initially in paperback, by Pan Books , after BBC Publishing had turned down the offer of publishing a novelization, an action they would later regret.

A hardback edition was published by Harmony Books, a division of Random House in the United States in October , and the US paperback edition was promoted by the give-away of 3, free copies in the magazine Rolling Stone to build word of mouth. In , Del Rey Books re-released the Hitchhiker series with new covers for the release of the movie. A photo-illustrated edition of the first novel appeared in In The Restaurant at the End of the Universe published in , Zaphod is separated from the others and finds he is part of a conspiracy to uncover who really runs the Universe.

Zaphod meets Zarniwoop , a conspirator and editor for The Guide , who knows where to find the secret ruler. Zaphod becomes briefly reunited with the others for a trip to Milliways , the restaurant of the title. Zaphod and Ford decide to steal a ship from there, which turns out to be a stunt ship pre-programmed to plunge into a star as a special effect in a stage show. Unable to change course, the main characters get Marvin to run the teleporter they find in the ship, which is working other than having no automatic control someone must remain behind to operate it , and Marvin seemingly sacrifices himself.

Zaphod and Trillian discover that the Universe is in the safe hands of a simple man living on a remote planet in a wooden shack with his cat. Ford and Arthur, meanwhile, end up on a spacecraft full of the outcasts of the Golgafrinchan civilization. The ship crashes on prehistoric Earth; Ford and Arthur are stranded, and it becomes clear that the inept Golgafrinchans are the ancestors of modern humans, having displaced the Earth's indigenous hominids.

This has disrupted the Earth's programming so that when Ford and Arthur manage to extract the final readout from Arthur's subconscious mind by pulling lettered tiles from a Scrabble set, it is "What do you get if you multiply six by nine? The book was adapted from the remaining material in the radio series—covering from the fifth episode to the twelfth episode, although the ordering was greatly changed in particular, the events of Fit the Sixth , with Ford and Arthur being stranded on pre-historic Earth, end the book, and their rescue in Fit the Seventh is deleted , and most of the Brontitall incident was omitted, instead of the Haggunenon sequence, co-written by John Loyd, the Disaster Area stunt ship was substituted—this having first been introduced in the LP version.

Adams himself considered Restaurant to be his best novel of the five. There they run into Slartibartfast, who enlists their aid in preventing galactic war. Long ago, the people of Krikkit attempted to wipe out all life in the Universe, but they were stopped and imprisoned on their home planet; now they are poised to escape.

leondumoulin.nl/language/lab/tales-of-troy-and.php With the help of Marvin, Zaphod, and Trillian, our heroes prevent the destruction of life in the Universe and go their separate ways. This was the first Hitchhiker's book originally written as a book and not adapted from radio.

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Its story was based on a treatment Adams had written for a Doctor Who theatrical release, [31] with the Doctor role being split between Slartibartfast to begin with , and later Trillian and Arthur. In it was adapted for radio as the Tertiary Phase of the radio series. In So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish published in , Arthur returns home to Earth, rather surprisingly since it was destroyed when he left. He meets and falls in love with a girl named Fenchurch , and discovers this Earth is a replacement provided by the dolphins in their Save the Humans campaign.

Eventually, he rejoins Ford, who claims to have saved the Universe in the meantime, to hitch-hike one last time and see God's Final Message to His Creation. Along the way, they are joined by Marvin, the Paranoid Android, who, although 37 times older than the universe itself what with time travel and all , has just enough power left in his failing body to read the message and feel better about it all before expiring.

This was the first Hitchhiker's novel which was not an adaptation of any previously written story or script.